Islamic Bioethics And End-Of-Life Care: A Practical Workshop | May 17 - May 17, 2014

CME PROGRAM

Islamic Association of Collin County; Plano, Texas

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the essential areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of APPNA and University of Chicago's Initiative on Islam and Medicine. APPNA is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to present continuing medical education programs for physicians. APPNA designates this program for 4 credit(s) in Category 1 of the Physicians Recognition Award of the American Medical Association. Each physician should claim only credit for time actually spent in the educational activity.

To register for this workshop, please click on the following link.

https://pmr.uchicago.edu/iim-dallas

CME Program | Islamic Bioethics And End-Of-Life Care: A Practical Workshop

Saturday 17 May 2014    10:00 AM 11:00 AM: What Makes Islamic Bioethics "Islamic"?: A Conceptual Overview

Aasim Padela   MD, MSc  Assistant Professor of Medicine and Director of the Initiative on Islam and Medicine
Saturday 17 May 2014    11:00 AM 12:00 PM: Non-Maleficence in Islam and the Boundaries of Avoiding Harm

Khalil Abdur-Rashid   MA, PhD Candidate at Columbia University, New York  Dean of TAQUA Seminary
Saturday 17 May 2014    12:00 PM 1:00 PM: Islamic Bioethics at the End-of-Life: Navigating the Challenges of Brain Death, Withdrawing Life Support, & End-of-Life Decision Making

Aasim Padela   MD, MSc  Assistant Professor of Medicine and Director of the Initiative on Islam and Medicine
Saturday 17 May 2014    1:00 PM 2:00 PM: Working Lunch Discussion: Cases from Participants & Practical Steps Forward

Aasim Padela, MD and Khalil Abdur-Rashid, PhD    

What Makes Islamic Bioethics "Islamic"?: A Conceptual Overview


Learning Objectives

At the end of the presentation, participants should be able to:
  • Identify the major sources of Islamic morality and how they relate to an "Islamic" bioethics.
  • Differentiate between Islamic bioethics, Muslim bioethics, and applied Islamic bioethics research.
  • Be able to define a fatwa and the proper usage of fatawa in making bioethical decisions.

Aasim Padela, MD, MSc

Assistant Professor of Medicine and Director of the Initiative on Islam and Medicine ,
University of Chicago School of Medicine ,
Assistant Professor of Medicine

View Financial Disclosure Form

Dr. Aasim Padela is the Director of the Initiative on Islam and Medicine, Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Sections of Emergency Medicine, and a faculty member at the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics. Dr. Padela holds an MD from Weill Cornell Medical College, completed residency in emergency medicine at the University of Rochester, and received an MS in Healthcare Research from the University of Michigan. His Islamic studies expertise comes via a BS in Classical Arabic from the University of Rochester, seminary studies during his formative years, and continued tutorials with Islamic authorities. His research assesses how religion-related factors affect the health behaviors and medical practices of American Muslim patients and physicians. Dr. Padela also explores how scientific data can work in concert with Islamic moral reasoning and theology to develop a comprehensive, theologically-rooted Islamic bioethics. As a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar from 2008-2011 he developed a program studying American Muslim health behaviors and healthcare challenges. In 2010, as a Visiting Fellow at the Oxford Centre of Islamic Studies he studied Islamic moral and theological frameworks, and from 2013 to 2015 as a Templeton Foundation Scholar he is conducting a national survey of Muslim physicians’ bioethical attitudes and professional experiences and leading a multidisciplinary working group at the intersection of Islamic theology and contemporary biomedicine.


Non-Maleficence in Islam and the Boundaries of Avoiding Harm


Learning Objectives

At the end of the presentation, participants should be able to:
  • To Understand the Definition and Boundaries of Harm in Islamic Ethics.
  • To Recognize the various factors which constitute Harm according to the Scholars of Islamic Ethical Jurisprudence.
  • To Differentiate between General and Specific Harm and understand which takes precedence.

Khalil Abdur-Rashid, MA, PhD Candidate at Columbia University, New York

Dean of TAQUA Seminary ,
TAQUA Seminary affiliated with the Islamic Association of Collin County

View Financial Disclosure Form

Shaykh Khalil was born in Atlanta, Georgia. He completed his degree in Social Work and worked for the state of Georgia as a social worker for several years. He pursued Islamic studies academically and traditionally which led him overseas to study for numerous years. He pursued his Master’s Degree in Istanbul, Turkey in Islamic Law at Marmara University. He also completed advanced Islamic seminary training and received his full license (Ijaaza) in Islamic Sciences. Shaykh Khalil received his Masters as well from Columbia University in New York City in Middle Eastern Studies, specializing in Islamic law and he is currently completing his PhD in Islamic Law at Columbia as well. He has taught numerous courses on Islam and Islamic law at NYU and Columbia and taught Arabic language at Georgia State University. He was the first paid Muslim Chaplain for Columbia University and Barnard College in New York and served as an advisor to the NYPD Police Commissioner. He also served as Imam for several years in New York City and has lectured at Harvard, Princeton, and NYU. He has relocated to Plano, Texas with his family and now serves as the Scholar-in-Residence for Plano Masjid and Dean of TAQUA Seminary."


Islamic Bioethics at the End-of-Life: Navigating the Challenges of Brain Death, Withdrawing Life Support, & End-of-Life Decision Making


Learning Objectives

At the end of the presentation, participants should be able to:
  • Summarize the major features of Islamic verdicts regarding the obligation to seek medical treatment.
  • Understand Islamic perspectives on brain death.
  • Recognize the Islamic ethical obligations and consideration regarding the maintenance of life support.

Aasim Padela, MD, MSc

Assistant Professor of Medicine and Director of the Initiative on Islam and Medicine ,
University of Chicago School of Medicine ,
Assistant Professor of Medicine

View Financial Disclosure Form

Dr. Aasim Padela is the Director of the Initiative on Islam and Medicine, Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Sections of Emergency Medicine, and a faculty member at the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics. Dr. Padela holds an MD from Weill Cornell Medical College, completed residency in emergency medicine at the University of Rochester, and received an MS in Healthcare Research from the University of Michigan. His Islamic studies expertise comes via a BS in Classical Arabic from the University of Rochester, seminary studies during his formative years, and continued tutorials with Islamic authorities. His research assesses how religion-related factors affect the health behaviors and medical practices of American Muslim patients and physicians. Dr. Padela also explores how scientific data can work in concert with Islamic moral reasoning and theology to develop a comprehensive, theologically-rooted Islamic bioethics. As a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar from 2008-2011 he developed a program studying American Muslim health behaviors and healthcare challenges. In 2010, as a Visiting Fellow at the Oxford Centre of Islamic Studies he studied Islamic moral and theological frameworks, and from 2013 to 2015 as a Templeton Foundation Scholar he is conducting a national survey of Muslim physicians’ bioethical attitudes and professional experiences and leading a multidisciplinary working group at the intersection of Islamic theology and contemporary biomedicine.


Working Lunch Discussion: Cases from Participants & Practical Steps Forward


Learning Objectives

At the end of the presentation, participants should be able to:
  • Employ concepts from Islamic theology and law to effect bioethical decision-making near the end-of-life.
  • Distinguish between the different responsibilities of Muslim physicians and Imams in end-of-life care decision-making.
  • Identify intellectual resources on Islamic bioethics that can service Muslim patients, physicians and religious leaders.

Aasim Padela, MD and Khalil Abdur-Rashid, PhD,

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