Mapping Out An Islamic Bioethics: An Intensive Workshop | August 1 - August 3, 2014

CME PROGRAM

University of Chicago Hospitals; Chicago, Illinois

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the essential areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of APPNA and University of Chicago's Initiative on Islam and Medicine. APPNA is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to present continuing medical education programs for physicians. APPNA designates this program for 15 credit(s) in Category 1 of the Physicians Recognition Award of the American Medical Association. Each physician should claim only credit for time actually spent in the educational activity.
 

To register for this workshop, please click on the following link.

http://pmr.uchicago.edu/page/aug-bioethics

CME Program | Mapping Out An Islamic Bioethics: An Intensive Workshop

Friday 01 Aug 2014    9:00 AM 10:45 AM: The Actors and Material of Islamic Bioethics

Aasim Padela   MD, MSc  Assistant Professor of Medicine and Director of the Initiative on Islam and Medicine
Friday 01 Aug 2014    10:45 AM 11:00 AM: Break

Break    
Friday 01 Aug 2014    11:00 AM 12:30 PM: What is “Islamic” Bioethics? – A Theological Introduction

Aasim Padela   MD, MSc  Assistant Professor of Medicine and Director of the Initiative on Islam and Medicine
Friday 01 Aug 2014    12:30 PM 2:00 PM: Networking/Jummah Lunch Provided

Lunch    
Friday 01 Aug 2014    2:00 PM 3:15 PM: The Many Methods of Medical Ethics

Daniel Sulmasy   MD  Professor of Ethics, University of Chicago Divinity School
Friday 01 Aug 2014    3:15 PM 3:30 PM: Break

Break    
Friday 01 Aug 2014    3:30 PM 5:00 PM: Case Study: Physician Attitudes, Philosophical Quandaries & Legal Rules Surrounding Brain Death – Padela & Qazi

Faisal Qazi  MD  Associate Professor of Neurology at Western University of Health Sciences
Saturday 02 Aug 2014    9:00 AM 10:45 AM: Islamic Ethics- From Fiqh to Tasawwuf

Issam Eido  PhD  Visiting Instructor of Islamic Studies and Arabic
Saturday 02 Aug 2014    10:45 AM 11:00 AM: Break

Break    
Saturday 02 Aug 2014    11:00 AM 12:30 PM: The Tools of the Islamic Ethico-Legal Tradition (Usul)

Jawad Anwar Qureshi   PhD Candidate Islamic Studies   PhD Candidate Islamic Studies
Saturday 02 Aug 2014    12:30 PM 1:30 PM: Networking/Break - Lunch Provided

Lunch    
Saturday 02 Aug 2014    1:30 PM 2:00 PM: Lived Experiences of Muslim Bioethics in Muslim Societies

Elham Mireshghi     PhD candidate, University of California, Irvine
Saturday 02 Aug 2014    2:00 PM 2:30 PM: Lived Experiences of Muslim Bioethics in Muslim Societies

Ahmed Khitamy    Secretary
Saturday 02 Aug 2014    2:30 PM 2:50 PM: Break

Break    
Saturday 02 Aug 2014    2:50 PM 4:00 PM: Islamic Ethics - Doctrinal Considerations for a Philosophy of Medicine

Mohammed Amin Kholwadia    Director
Sunday 03 Aug 2014    9:00 AM 10:45 AM: A Foot in Both Worlds: Navigating Between a Muslim Healing Ethos and Conventional Clinical Ethics

Katherine Klima   DNP, CNM  Former Ethics Fellow, Maclean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics
Sunday 03 Aug 2014    10:45 AM 11:45 AM: Researching and Reading Islamic Bioethics: Approaches & Limitations

Aasim Padela   MD, MSc  Assistant Professor of Medicine and Director of the Initiative on Islam and Medicine
Sunday 03 Aug 2014    11:45 AM 12:35 PM: Course Feedback

Course Feedback    

The Actors and Material of Islamic Bioethics


Learning Objectives

At the end of the presentation, participants should be able to:
  • Describe the different disciplinary experts and their goals with respect to producing Islamic bioethics material.
  • Describe the limitations of the extant genre of Islamic bioethics discourse.
  • Identify ways in which to fill in the gaps in the Islamic bioethics discourse.

Aasim Padela, MD, MSc

Assistant Professor of Medicine and Director of the Initiative on Islam and Medicine ,
University of Chicago School of Medicine ,
Assistant Professor of Medicine

View Financial Disclosure Form

Dr. Aasim Padela is the Director of the Initiative on Islam and Medicine, Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Sections of Emergency Medicine, and a faculty member at the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics. Dr. Padela holds an MD from Weill Cornell Medical College, completed residency in emergency medicine at the University of Rochester, and received an MS in Healthcare Research from the University of Michigan. His Islamic studies expertise comes via a BS in Classical Arabic from the University of Rochester, seminary studies during his formative years, and continued tutorials with Islamic authorities. His research assesses how religion-related factors affect the health behaviors and medical practices of American Muslim patients and physicians. Dr. Padela also explores how scientific data can work in concert with Islamic moral reasoning and theology to develop a comprehensive, theologically-rooted Islamic bioethics. As a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar from 2008-2011 he developed a program studying American Muslim health behaviors and healthcare challenges. In 2010, as a Visiting Fellow at the Oxford Centre of Islamic Studies he studied Islamic moral and theological frameworks, and from 2013 to 2015 as a Templeton Foundation Scholar he is conducting a national survey of Muslim physicians’ bioethical attitudes and professional experiences and leading a multidisciplinary working group at the intersection of Islamic theology and contemporary biomedicine.


What is “Islamic” Bioethics? – A Theological Introduction


Learning Objectives

At the end of the presentation, participants should be able to:
  • Identify the major sources of Islamic morality and how they relate to an "Islamic" bioethics.
  • Differentiate between Islamic bioethics, Muslim bioethics, and applied Islamic bioethics research.
  • Be able to define a fatwa and the proper usage of fatawa in making bioethical decisions.

Aasim Padela, MD, MSc

Assistant Professor of Medicine and Director of the Initiative on Islam and Medicine ,
University of Chicago School of Medicine ,
Assistant Professor of Medicine

View Financial Disclosure Form

Dr. Aasim Padela is the Director of the Initiative on Islam and Medicine, Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Sections of Emergency Medicine, and a faculty member at the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics. Dr. Padela holds an MD from Weill Cornell Medical College, completed residency in emergency medicine at the University of Rochester, and received an MS in Healthcare Research from the University of Michigan. His Islamic studies expertise comes via a BS in Classical Arabic from the University of Rochester, seminary studies during his formative years, and continued tutorials with Islamic authorities. His research assesses how religion-related factors affect the health behaviors and medical practices of American Muslim patients and physicians. Dr. Padela also explores how scientific data can work in concert with Islamic moral reasoning and theology to develop a comprehensive, theologically-rooted Islamic bioethics. As a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar from 2008-2011 he developed a program studying American Muslim health behaviors and healthcare challenges. In 2010, as a Visiting Fellow at the Oxford Centre of Islamic Studies he studied Islamic moral and theological frameworks, and from 2013 to 2015 as a Templeton Foundation Scholar he is conducting a national survey of Muslim physicians’ bioethical attitudes and professional experiences and leading a multidisciplinary working group at the intersection of Islamic theology and contemporary biomedicine.


The Many Methods of Medical Ethics


Learning Objectives

At the end of the presentation, participants should be able to:
  • Distinguish between empirical and theoretical methods in medical ethics.
  • Define the naturalistic fallacy.
  • Describe the relationship between empirical and theoretical methods in medical ethics.

Daniel Sulmasy, MD

Professor of Ethics, University of Chicago Divinity School ,
Professor of Medicine, Director of the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics ,
Director of the Program on Medicine and Religion, University of Chicago School of Medicine

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Dr. Sulmasy is the Kilbride-Clinton Professor of Medicine and Ethics in the Department of Medicine and Divinity School at the University of Chicago, where he serves as Associate Director of the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics and Director of the Program on Medicine and Religion. He received his A.B. and M.D. degrees from Cornell, his PhD in philosophy from Georgetown, and his internal medicine training at Hopkins.  His research encompasses both theoretical and empirical investigations of the ethics of end-of-life decision-making, ethics education, and spirituality in medicine.  He has written or edited six books—The Healer’s Calling (1997), Methods in Medical Ethics (2001; 2nd ed. 2010), The Rebirth of the Clinic (2006), A Balm for Gilead (2006), Safe Passage (2014) and Francis the Leper (2014).  He is editor-in-chief of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics and serves on the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues. His numerous articles have appeared in medical, philosophical, and theological journals and he lectures widely.


Case Study: Physician Attitudes, Philosophical Quandaries & Legal Rules Surrounding Brain Death – Padela & Qazi


Learning Objectives

At the end of the presentation, participants should be able to:
  • Summarize the major features of Islamic verdicts regarding the obligation to seek medical treatment.
  • Understand Islamic perspectives on brain death.
  • Recognize the Islamic ethical obligations and consideration regarding the maintenance of life support.

Faisal Qazi, MD

Associate Professor of Neurology at Western University of Health Sciences ,
College of Osteopathic Medicine ,
Director of Stroke Center, San Antonio Community Hospital, Upland

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Dr. Faisal Qazi is the founder of MiNDS (Medical Network Devoted to Service) established in 2012, a community development and charitable healthcare foundation. He is also a Commissioner for the City of Fullerton serving on its Citizen’s Community Development Committee as of 2014. He is the recipient of 40 under 40 Outstanding Service award by New Leaders Council in 2012 and Excellence in Leadership Award by the Representative of CA State Assembly via Access California in 2013. Dr. Qazi founded and became the first CEO of HUDA (Health Unit on Davison Avenue) free clinic in Detroit in 2004. He had the distinct honor to present the works of such institutions at a Congressional briefing in October of 2008 in Washington DC, where he proposed opportunities for safety net clinics in the health reform process. Dr. Qazi’s research interests involve concepts in Neuroethics and he has presented about Disorders of Consciousness on various occasions. His latest research has included reviewing neuroscientific advances in the field of consciousness, metaphysics of soul, and the philosophy of mind. Dr. Qazi has been practicing Neurology in greater Pomona Valley and the Inland Empire area since 2006 and in North Orange County since 2012. He is the Associate Professor of Neurology at Western University of Health Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine in Pomona, California.  He is currently the Director of Stroke at San Antonio Community Hospital. Dr. Qazi’s work has been featured in interviews to NPR, Voice of America, CNN and PBS.  His columns have been printed in Inland Valley Daily Bulletin and San Bernardino Sun.


Islamic Ethics- From Fiqh to Tasawwuf


Abstract:


The question of ethics in Islamic studies occupied a number of academic and non-academic works. Most of these works focus on philosophical, spiritual, and Islamic law aspects. This paper attempts to tackle this issue through a historical approach, and to explain the
evolution of Fiqh, and how the Islamic ethics were developed through two different periods, formative and post-formative.

Learning Objectives

At the end of the presentation, participants should be able to:
  • What do Islamic ethics mean in these two different periods, formative and postformative?
  • What are Islamic ethics that fiqh and tasawwuf concern about? Or what do we mean by Islamic ethics in a fiqh or tasawwuf perspective?
  • In our modern age, could we follow one of these perspectives or we should follow both of them?

Issam Eido, PhD

Visiting Instructor of Islamic Studies and Arabic ,
University of Chicago ,
Divinity School

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Dr. Issam Eido is a Visiting fellow of Islamic Studies and Arabic in the University of Chicago Divinity School during the 2013-2014 academic year. Dr. Eido’s research focuses on the Qur'an in late antiquity, Hadith Studies, and Sufi and Arabic literary and poetic studies. A 2010 PhD graduate of Damascus University, he also served that institution from 2010-2012 as Lecturer in the Department of Quranic Studies and History of Islamic Sciences. In 2012 he was a Fellow of the “Europe in the Middle East/Middle East in Europe” Research program at the Forum Transregionale Studien in Berlin. A skilled teacher of Arabic, Dr. Eido teaches courses in Qur’anic Arabic while at the University of Chicago.


The Tools of the Islamic Ethico-Legal Tradition (Usul)


Learning Objectives

At the end of the presentation, participants should be able to:
  • understand the broad structure of Islamic ethical thinking, in conversation with Western ethics
  • be exposed to various contemporary trends in Islamic ethics
  • see these trends exemplified through case studies

Jawad Anwar Qureshi, PhD Candidate Islamic Studies

PhD Candidate Islamic Studies ,
University of Chicago ,
Divinity School

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Jawad Anwar Qureshi is a Phd Candidate in Islamic Studies at the University of Chicago's Divinity School. His dissertation--titled, "Sunni Tradition in the Age of Renewal and Reform: Said Ramadan al-Bouti (1929-2013) and His Interlocutors"--examines debates amongst 20th century Damascene `ulama on questions of tradition, modernity, and politics. His interests relate to Islamic thought (theology, law, ethics, and Sufism).


Lived Experiences of Muslim Bioethics in Muslim Societies


Abstract:


For over 15 years, Iran has implemented the only bureaucratically-routinized program for paid kidney giving in the world. This was made possible in part by permissive fatwas or legal opinions from high-ranking Shi‘a jurists. In this presentation, I explain the way in which certain principles of Islamic jurisprudence converged with reductive medical assumptions to render the sale of kidneys unproblematic. Furthermore, I demonstrate with the example of kidney selling, how policy-oriented fatwas (versus individuated fatwas) can assume an abstract depersonalized and detemporalized subject, which can greatly influence the outcome of jurisprudential decrees. I then discuss the kinds of questions and problems this raises for our understanding of ‘Islamic Bioethics.’

Learning Objectives

At the end of the presentation, participants should be able to:
  • Understanding the possible on the ground contingencies of fatwa formation.
  • Understanding how conceptualizing an ethical problem as a matter of state policy can influence the outcome of fatwas.
  • Rethinking Islamic Bioethics.

Elham Mireshghi ,

PhD candidate, University of California, Irvine

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Elham Mireshghi is an anthropologist and PhD candidate at the University of California, Irvine. Her dissertation ethnographically examines the development and implementation of the world’s only regulated and religiously sanctioned program for kidney sales. Her project was funded by the National Science Foundation and the Wenner-Gren Foundation. She has also been awarded the Charlotte Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship on Religion & Ethics from the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. Prior to entering the field of anthropology she received a Bsc. in electrical engineering and computer science from UC Berkeley.


Lived Experiences of Muslim Bioethics in Muslim Societies


Abstract:


Seeking knowledge is compulsory in Islam. It encourages man to contemplate and explore new horizons for the benefit of humanity. Stem cell research is one of these new horizons that promises a wide variety of benefits for humanity. However this scientific promise has been shrouded by ethical, moral and religious anxieties. More than any other professional, a Muslim physician is confronted more frequently with issues that demand Islamic legitimacy of his actions. He is always challenged with controversial ethical issues on which he is supposed to decide:  gamete donation and the right to know genetic parents, embryonic stem cell research, fetal rights with respect to the woman's autonomy, therapeutic cloning, trans-sexual operations, plastic cosmetic surgeries, extra-uterine conception, and end-of-life issues are examples of these issues. These recurrent controversial and problematic issues sometimes puts a Muslim doctor  in a dilemma between the current medico-legal issues based on secular law and his Islamic guidelines and principles.

The Omani National Bioethics Committee whose membership includes renowned Muslim scholars, jurists, physicians and bioethicists meet regularly to decide on appropriate regulations and legislation on bioethical issues for the Sultanate of Oman.

Firstly, this paper will review the duties and objectives of the Omani National Bioethics Committee. Secondly, the paper will highlight the tools used by the committee in formulating the bioethical guidelines and regulations for the country. Thirdly, the paper will examine the committee's mutual relationship with other National Bioethics Committees in the Arab and Muslim world. Finally the paper will discuss the challenges facing this committee with special reference to gamete donation and the right to know genetic parents, stem cell research and end-of-life issues.

Learning Objectives

At the end of the presentation, participants should be able to:
  • Understanding the possible on the ground contingencies of fatwa formation.
  • Understanding how conceptualizing an ethical problem as a matter of state policy can influence the outcome of fatwas.
  • Rethinking Islamic Bioethics.

Ahmed Khitamy,

Secretary ,
Sultan Qaboos University, Oman ,
National Committee for Bioethics

View Financial Disclosure Form

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Islamic Ethics - Doctrinal Considerations for a Philosophy of Medicine


Abstract:


Human beings acquire knowledge through various means.  Muslims believe that their knowledge of Islam is acquired by knowing and understanding revelation.  Muslims believe revelation is a non-acquired form of knowledge.  However, knowing and understanding this form of knowledge is contingent upon knowing and understanding other forms of knowledge that are acquired. 

Understanding the epistemology of early Muslims allow us to appreciate the means of knowledge that they use in order to understand Islamic precepts, concepts, maxims, and rules.  This lecture will highlight how the Maturidi branch of Muslim theologians and legal jurists came to terms with understanding and practicing revelation that came to the Prophet Muhammad (S).

Learning Objectives

At the end of the presentation, participants should be able to:
  • To introduce the Maturidi framework for medical practitioner.
  • How the Maturdi framework offers a method to engage in modern day bioethics.
  • To open a dialogue between Muslim theologians and Muslim medical practitioner.

Mohammed Amin Kholwadia,

Director ,
Darul Islamic Institute

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Shaykh Mohammed Amin is a well-known Muslim scholar and theologian. Shaykh Amin received training in Islamic sciences such as the exegesis of the Qur’an, the science of Hadith transmission, and Islamic law and theology in the Indian subcontinent. His studies culminated at the world-renowned Islamic seminary in Deoband, India. He received further instruction in Islamic Law at the Shariah Court of Patna in Bihar, India. He also received instruction in Islamic theism and theosophy from his mentor Shaykh Meeran at Sabil al-Rashad in Bangalore, India.  Shaykh Amin has worked as a professional translator and a book reviewer in England where he was raised. Since his arrival in Chicago in 1984, he has served as a Muslim scholar in various capacities and as an advisor for Muslim schools, Muslim organizations, and the Council of Religious Leaders of Greater Chicagoland. Shaykh Amin has co-authored Islamic Finance: What it is and what it could be (published in England). He has also written a book on Qur’anic exegesis entitled A Spark From the Dynamo of Prophethood. In the works is a book on Ghazalian eschatology.  In 1998, Shaykh Amin founded Darul Qasim, an institute of higher Islamic learning where both undergraduate and post-graduate studies are conducted under his direction and leadership. This effort, along with global speaking engagements and counseling services he provides, keep his academic faculties alive and sharp.


A Foot in Both Worlds: Navigating Between a Muslim Healing Ethos and Conventional Clinical Ethics


Abstract:


Muslim health care providers in the US often find ourselves between two worlds. What are the areas of convergence and divergence? Why are the four ethical principles that we are taught not sufficient for us? How can we bridge the gap? We will discuss some of the differences between Western philosophical and Islamic bioethics; compare practical strategies that are used within each discipline to address ethical dilemmas in health care; and discuss the implications for our practice.

Learning Objectives

At the end of the presentation, participants should be able to:
  • Describe key differences between ethical principalism and Islamic bioethics.
  • Compare the "four box" methodology to an Islamic approach to problem-solving.
  • Explore ethics-related responsibilities of the individual Muslim health care provider and the Muslim community as a whole.

Katherine Klima, DNP, CNM

Former Ethics Fellow, Maclean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics ,
Former Doctoral Research Trainee, Initiative on Islam and Medicine ,
Henry Ford Health System

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Katherine Klima is a nurse midwife and clinical ethicist with more than 35 years of experience in women's health care. For the past eleven years she has worked for Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, Michigan and has provided obstetric and gynecologic care to a predominantly immigrant Muslim community in neighboring Dearborn. She has been active in the education of midwives and physicians, the development of community-based health programs, practice improvement initiatives, clinical research, and the hospital ethics committee. 

Dr. Klima received her first Bachelors degree as a physician assistant from Hahnemann University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She then obtained both Bachelors and Masters degrees in nursing and midwifery from the University of Michigan, where she received a FLAS fellowship to learn Arabic and a research fellowship to study the practices and beliefs of pregnant Muslim women regarding fasting during Ramadan. More recently, she completed a fellowship in clinical ethics at the University of Chicago's MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics, and a Doctorate in Nursing Practice at Madonna University. Her research interests include ethical concerns related to prenatal genetic testing, influences of religion on health, and the theory and
practice of nursing from an Islamic perspective.


Researching and Reading Islamic Bioethics: Approaches & Limitations


Learning Objectives

At the end of the presentation, participants should be able to:
  • Identify major sources and repositories for Islamic bioethics guidance.
  • Describe the limitations of fatwa-based reasoning and the Islamic end-goals of medical practice.
  • Map out a research strategy for conducting Islamic bioethics research.

Aasim Padela, MD, MSc

Assistant Professor of Medicine and Director of the Initiative on Islam and Medicine ,
University of Chicago School of Medicine ,
Assistant Professor of Medicine

View Financial Disclosure Form

Dr. Aasim Padela is the Director of the Initiative on Islam and Medicine, Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Sections of Emergency Medicine, and a faculty member at the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics. Dr. Padela holds an MD from Weill Cornell Medical College, completed residency in emergency medicine at the University of Rochester, and received an MS in Healthcare Research from the University of Michigan. His Islamic studies expertise comes via a BS in Classical Arabic from the University of Rochester, seminary studies during his formative years, and continued tutorials with Islamic authorities. His research assesses how religion-related factors affect the health behaviors and medical practices of American Muslim patients and physicians. Dr. Padela also explores how scientific data can work in concert with Islamic moral reasoning and theology to develop a comprehensive, theologically-rooted Islamic bioethics. As a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar from 2008-2011 he developed a program studying American Muslim health behaviors and healthcare challenges. In 2010, as a Visiting Fellow at the Oxford Centre of Islamic Studies he studied Islamic moral and theological frameworks, and from 2013 to 2015 as a Templeton Foundation Scholar he is conducting a national survey of Muslim physicians’ bioethical attitudes and professional experiences and leading a multidisciplinary working group at the intersection of Islamic theology and contemporary biomedicine.